Click for Cookbook LOGIN
"I don't think America will have really made it until we have our own salad dressing. Until then we're stuck behind the French, Italians, Russians and Caesarians."--Pat McNelis

MOTHERíS ENGLISH RED CABBAGE Recipe

  Tried it? Rate this Recipe:
 

 

This recipe for MOTHERíS ENGLISH RED CABBAGE is from ARTichokes and Anecdotes, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We'll help you start your own personal cookbook! It's easy and fun. Click here to start your own cookbook!

Contributor:  
Contributor:  

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 small head Red Cabbage, about 1-1/2 lbs.
1 large Apple
1 large Onion
3/4 cup Sugar
1/3 cup Cider Vinegar
1/4 cup (1 stick) Butter

Directions:
Directions:
Remove and discard tough outer leaves of cabbage. Cut cabbage into four wedges. Remove core pieces and discard. Slice cabbage into thin pieces. Place in a large, deep pot. Peel and core an apple. Chop and place in pot. Peel, pare and chop an onion and place in the pot. Discard all peels and parings. Pour boiling water over all so that all the food in the pot is submerged. Simmer for about 1-1/4 hours, pushing ingredients under the water as the water cooks down. (Cooking the cabbage uncovered makes it more digestible and tastier.)

Pour the water off hot cabbage. Reserve. Pour 3/4 cup of water back into the pot. Reserve balance of water for reheating of leftovers. (As good or better reheated.) Add the butter to the pot and stir over medium low heat until melted. Next, pour vinegar over sugar and stir to dissolve. Add to simmering cabbage and cook 1/2 hour longer, uncovered.

Absolutely delicious, especially if served with roast duck or roast pork.

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
My first recipe is for Motherís English Red Cabbage. We all loved it so it was on the menu often, not only for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. It only happened once, but it was memorable to find motherís recipe for anything in a restaurant. I always loved it so I ordered it in a restaurant in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1974 thinking it might taste like German Rot Kohl. To my surprise it was identical to my motherís Red Cabbage recipe. It made me wonder if the Vikings had brought the recipe to England centuries ago or did the Vikings borrow it from the British? It really doesnít matter because itís delicious.

 

 

 

Learn more about the process to create a cookbook -- or
Start your own personal family cookbook right now!  Here's to good eating!

Search for more great recipes here from over 1,500,000 in our family cookbooks!

 

Bookmark and Share

 

 

1W  

Cookbooks are great for Holiday Gifts, Wedding Gifts, Bridal Shower ideas and Family Reunions!

*Recipes and photos entered into the Family Cookbook Project are provided by the submitting contributors. All rights are retained by the contributor. Please contact us if you believe copyright violations have occurred.


Search for more great recipes here from over 1,500,000 in our family cookbooks!