"I have long believed that good food, good eating is all about risk. Whether we're talking about unpasteurized Stilton, raw oysters or working for organized crime 'associates,' food, for me, has always been an adventure."--Anthony Bourdain

Salt and Yeast Recipe

  Tried it? Rate this Recipe:
 

 

This recipe for Salt and Yeast, by , is from Gay For Bread: The Art of Loving Bread and the Science Behind It, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We'll help you start your own personal cookbook! It's easy and fun. Click here to start your own cookbook!

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Dylan Hackel

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
This topic requires a bit of background information. The most important concept here is water potential (𝛹). 𝛹 is a measurement of the flow of water between different concentration gradients (the concentrations of two environments separated by a semi-permeable substance). Water flows the highest 𝛹 to the lowest 𝛹, or in other words from low concentrations of solute (dissolved substances), to high concentrations of solute. It does this to even out the concentrations, and eventually reach homeostasis, a point where a variable is at equilibrium. An example of 𝛹 is if you water a plant with salt water. If the concentration of salt is higher than the concentration of solutes in the cells, then water will flow from the plant into the salt water, and if this continues the plants will eventually wilt, because roots depend on having a lower 𝛹 than the water they are given. At this point you might be asking “ok Dylan, what does this have to do with bread,” and I understand the confusion, but I am getting there now.

Directions:
Directions:
In case you didn't know, yeast is a living organism. It is a single celled eukaryote(having a nucleus), and, fun fact: is a fungus. Because yeast is alive it is surrounded by a semi-permeable cell membrane, and requires water to function properly. However, just like a plant, if yeast is combined with salt, the water is going to flow from the yeast to the surroundings, making the yeast either die, or become less efficient. Because of this, you should always add yeast and salt to the opposite sides of the bowl, to prevent pre mixing.

 

 

 

Learn more about the process to create a cookbook -- or
Start your own personal family cookbook right now!  Here's to good eating!

Search for more great recipes here from over 500,000 in our family cookbooks!

 

Bookmark and Share

 

 

1W  

Cookbooks are great for Holiday Gifts, Wedding Gifts, Bridal Shower ideas and Family Reunions!

*Recipes and photos entered into the Family Cookbook Project are provided by the submitting contributors. All rights are retained by the contributor. Please contact us if you believe copyright violations have occurred.


Search for more great recipes here from over 500,000 in our family cookbooks!