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Braciole Recipe

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This recipe for Braciole, by , is from The DeGregori Family Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We'll help you start your own personal cookbook! It's easy and fun. Click here to start your own cookbook!

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Thomas DeGregori

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1/2 cup dried Italian-style bread crumbs
1 garlic clove, minced
2/3 cup grated Pecorino Romano
1/3 cup grated provolone
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
4 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 (1 1/2-pound) flank steak
1 cup dry white wine
3 1/4 cups Simple Tomato Sauce, recipe follows, or store-bought marinara sauce

Simple Tomato Sauce:

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 carrot, chopped
2 (32-ounce) cans crushed tomatoes
4 to 6 basil leaves
2 dried bay leaves
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, optional

Directions:
Directions:
Stir the first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend. Stir in 2 tablespoons of the oil. Season mixture with salt and pepper and set aside.

Lay the flank steak flat on the work surface. Sprinkle the bread crumb mixture evenly over the steak to cover the top evenly. Starting at 1 short end, roll up the steak as for a jelly roll to enclose the filling completely. Using butcher's twine, tie the steak roll to secure. Sprinkle the braciole with salt and pepper.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a heavy large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the braciole and cook until browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Add the wine to the pan and bring to a boil. Stir in the marinara sauce. Cover partially with foil and bake until the meat is almost tender, turning the braciole and basting with the sauce every 30 minutes. After 1 hour, uncover and continue baking until the meat is tender, about 30 minutes longer. The total cooking time should be about 1 1/2 hours.

Remove the braciole from the sauce. Using a large sharp knife, cut the braciole crosswise and diagonally into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Transfer the slices to plates. Spoon the sauce over and serve.
Simple Tomato Sauce:

In a large casserole pot, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic and saute until soft and translucent, about 2 minutes. Add celery and carrot and season with salt and pepper. Saute until all the vegetables are soft, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, basil, and bay leaves and reduce the heat to low. Cover the pot and simmer for 1 hour or until thick. Remove bay leaves and taste for seasoning. If sauce tastes too acidic, add unsalted butter, 1 tablespoon at a time, to round out the flavor.

Pour half the tomato sauce into the bowl of a food processor. Process until smooth. Continue with remaining tomato sauce.

If not using all the sauce, allow it to cool completely and then pour 1 to 2 cup portions into plastic freezer bags. Freeze for up to 6 months.

Mangia, Mangia, Tutti Mangiare

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
4
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
25 minutes
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Recipe courtesy of Giada De Laurentiis.

Growing up this was one of my favorite dishes of my mother's cooking. In Italian-American cuisine, Braciola or the plural Braciole (the word is commonly pronounced /bra'zhul/ from the Sicilian language) is the name given to slices of beef that are rolled as a roulade (this category of rolled food is known as involtini in Italian). In Sicilian, this dish is also called Bruciuluni.

The parsley, basil. cheeses (Pecorino Romano but Parmesan instead of Provolone) and extra virgin olive oil in this recipe are the ingredients for a Ligurian/Genoa (where Pesto originated) Pesto except for the pine nuts. For Braciole, pesto could be substituted for these ingredients only if necessary.

The very best articles on Pesto that I have ever read and the next best recipe to Gayle”s:

Eat: Pounded, Not Blended: The Key to This Creamy, Thick Pesto? A Mortar and Pestle By Samin Nosrat, The New York Times Magazine, Sunday, November 11, 2018, Pp. 30-31.

Basil Pesto Sauce by SAMIN NOSRAT. The New York Times, August 2, 2016

Five Sauces for the Modern Cook by SAMIN NOSRAT, The New York Times, August 2, 2016


 

 

 

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