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Somali Mushaali (Oats, Honey and Chia Seeds Porridge) Recipe

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Somali Mushaali (Oats, Honey and Chia Seeds Porridge) image
Kelsey Sour, SNM/SWHNP

 

This recipe for Somali Mushaali (Oats, Honey and Chia Seeds Porridge), by , is from Multicultural Meals with Midwives, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We'll help you start your own personal cookbook! It's easy and fun. Click here to start your own cookbook!

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Georgetown University

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 cup rolled oats
2 cups milk
50 grams nuts – I used almonds and these worked great!
½ teaspoon chia seeds
Pinch of cinnamon (ground black pepper could also be used)
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon honey for drizzling when serving

Directions:
Directions:
Place all ingredients in a pan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly until the mixture sticks to the spoon. For creamier porridge, add more milk. Serve in a bowl with a drizzle of honey.
Adapted and used with permission from www.somalikitchen.com/oats-honey-and-chia-seeds-porridge-mushaali.html/

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Somalia, located on the eastern coast of Africa, is home to 10,787,000 people. There is also a large population of Somalian people in the United States, as civil war has driven refugees to migrate out of Somalia.
Women primarily give birth at home, attended by a traditional birth attendant or sometimes a midwife. Soon-to-be mothers also have strong support systems of female relatives and community members who provide comfort and support during labor. These women will often host a celebration prior to the birth as a sign of support for the soon-to-be mother. After birth, the baby is protected from the Evil Eye with an herb called malmal, which is applied to the umbilical stump for seven days and woven into a bracelet which the baby wears. The woman and her child then remain at home for forty days being taken care of by female family members and friends. This time period is called afatabah and its purpose is to allow the new mother to rest, bond with and breastfeed her infant.

Food is prepared for the mother during afatabah and it is not uncommon to see maternal weight gain in these first forty days postpartum. Her diet will consist of semisolid foods, soups and teas as these are thought to be filling and enhance breast milk production. The baby will be both breast and bottle fed, with women often breastfeeding for up to two and a half years. Food is offered to the woman before and after she breastfeeds to enhance maternal nourishment. At the end of afatanbah, a “coming out” celebration is held for the baby at the home of a family member or friend. At this time, the family may also participate in a naming ceremony for the baby.

 

 

 

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