"The first zucchini I ever saw I killed it with a hoe."--John Gould, Monstrous Depravity, 1963

Classic Pumpkin Pie Recipe

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This recipe for Classic Pumpkin Pie, by , is from , one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Kimberly Owens

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
2 eggs
1 (15 oz) can 100% pumpkin (NOT pumpkin pie filling)
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar (packed)
1/2 tsp salt
1 heaping tsp cinnamon
1 small can (5.33 oz) evaporated milk

Make paste with: 2 Tbsp milk and 1 Tbsp flour

Directions:
Directions:
Mix ingredients in order given, using milk and flour to make a paste before mixing in with the rest of the ingredients. Pour mixture into pie crust and bake at 425 F for 20 minutes, then reduce heat to 365 F and bake an additional 35 minutes. Use a pie shield or aluminum foil over pie crust so that it does not burn. Remove pie from oven when knife inserted about an inch from the center comes out clean or fine cracks appear in the top of the pie. The center of the pie will still be a bit jiggly, but it will set as the pie cools. Let cool and serve with whipped cream. Optional: May add pumpkin pie spice or other spices to suit your personal taste. Grandmother only used cinnamon, so that is how I recorded her recipe

This is my Grandmother's recipe that she taught to my Mom, and Mom taught to me. Mom would make about a half dozen of these pies every Thanksgiving and send one home with everyone who came to Thanksgiving dinner.

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
I want to share: You may also use fresh pumpkin puree instead of canned pumpkin to make this pie. To make your own pumpkin puree at home, most people use the small sugar pumpkins, also known as "pie pumpkins", but the flesh of these pumpkins tends to be yellow in color instead of orange, and they do not have nearly the same taste as commercially canned pumpkin, so your pie will turn out bland. This is because big companies, such as Libby's, produce their own variety of pumpkin that is actually closer to butternut squash than pumpkin, which is why their canned "pumpkin" tastes so good! So the easiest thing to do is just cook butternut squash and use that puree instead of pumpkin, and you will have the best tasting "pumpkin" pies around. To do this, just slice the stem off the butternut squash, then cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds with a spoon, then place cut side up in a baking pan. You may brush the tops with some melted butter or oil to keep the top from drying out. Bake at 400 degrees for 50-60 minutes, until flesh is easily pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool enough to handle. Using a spoon, scoop the flesh out of the skin and puree using a food processor until very fine. Scoop puree into a mesh strainer or sieve placed over a bowl. If using a sieve with large holes, you may want to line it with a coffee strainer or cheese cloth so the puree does not seep through the holes. Place this in the refrigerator overnight or at least for several hours to allow the excess liquid to drain out, otherwise your pie will be soggy. You may also save the liquid that drained out to use in soups, breads, muffins, or pancakes. The puree may now be used in pies or frozen in freezer bags in 2 cup portions, which is the equivalent of one can of pumpkin. If you would like to use pumpkin instead of butternut squash, then I would suggest the large, short, pale, flesh colored pumpkins. They are know by many different names, such as field pumpkins, cheese pumpkins, etc. There are many other squash that you can use as well, such as kabocha and red kuri. Don't try to use the big orange Jack-o-lantern pumpkins, because their flesh tends to be thin, pale, tasteless, and watery. Most of the larger pumpkins will be too large to bake in the oven in halves, so you can cut it into quarters or smaller and roast the same way as the butternut squash for 1 to 1 1/2 hours until the flesh is fork tender. Make sure you use a pan with high sides, because the pumpkin will drain much more liquid than butternut squash. Then follow the same instructions for making butternut squash puree, especially the draining, which may take longer, and you may have to stir the puree a few times to get enough water out of the puree. To make pumpkin pie, you would use 2 cups of homemade puree instead of one can pumpkin.

 

 

 

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