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Cajun fried Venison Backstrap Recipe

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This recipe for Cajun fried Venison Backstrap, by , is from The Sevin Family Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:
Joe Cagnolatti
Added: Friday, December 01, 2006

Category:

Ingredients:
For one backstrap of an average size deer, about 5 lbs of meat

Remove all fat and sinew from the backstrap. The sinew is easily removed with a filet knife; slice the tough layer of tissue away from the meat by placing the sinew side against a cutting board. Run the knife along the sinew just like you do when filleting a bass or speckled trout. Voila!

Next, slice the backstrap into steaks about ¼” to 3/8” thick, cutting directly across the grain of the meat.

If you have access to a cross cut type of meat tenderizer for making cutlets, run the steaks through the machine. Otherwise you can pound the steaks the old fashioned way with a meat tenderizing hammer. But this old way will require about a six-pack of Budweiser to compensate the chef’s assistant. Next place the tenderized backstrap into a large stainless steel bowl, and completely cover with evaporated milk. Put in refrigerator overnight.

If you are short on time, the meat does not absolutely have to be tenderized / pounded. Instead, sprinkle with Adolph’s meat tenderizer and each steak should be pierced with a fork to get the Adolph’s into the meat. Next soak the meat in Pet milk for a minimum of two hours.

Breading and seasonings ingredients:

About 1.5 pounds of plain flour
Three eggs
8 oz Pet milk (in addition to that used for soaking)
Black and cayenne pepper, salt, garlic powder, onion powder. Or just use Tony’s season.
One gallon of high quality cooking oil (peanut or corn oil)

It is best to use a Cajun Batter Bowl to flour the back strap for frying. Put about two inches of flour into one half of the bowl. Season the flour with seasonings to suit your taste. You can taste a pinch of the flour, and it should be highly seasoned, because the flavors will be diminished by the meat and frying.

Drain the pet milk used for soaking from the meat and discard. Leave the steaks in the bowl wet and moist with pet milk. If you want the meat to be very spicy, sprinkle cayenne pepper and black pepper on the steaks. Break three eggs into a medium bowl and whip into scrambled eggs. Pour cooking oil into a 12-quart or larger cast iron Dutch oven or “jambalaya pot” until oil is a minimum of 4 inches deep. Set onto a crawfish-boiling burner on high heat. Use thermometer to get oil to 375deg F. Lower fire to maintain temperature.

While the oil is heating up, get the meat ready for the pot. Individually, submerge each steak in the egg batter, and place on the seasoned flour in the Cajun batter bowl (Large paper sack works well for the flour also. When you have one layer of meat on top of the flour, put the Cajun batter bowl together and shake vigorously. Turn upside down to sift excess flour away. Place battered steaks onto a plate. You may have time to prepare two batched of meat for frying while the cooking oil is heating up.

Directions:
Fry until golden brown, be careful not to overcook. Medium with just a hint of a pink center is best. Enjoy!

 

 

 

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