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Gravy-Uncle Ford's Tips and Method Recipe

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Gravy-Uncle Ford's Tips and Method image
Christmas Eve 1954

 

This recipe for Gravy-Uncle Ford's Tips and Method, by , is from The Martinson Family Cookbook , one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Ford Peterson
Added: Thursday, February 10, 2011

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
3 to 6 heaping tablespoons of all-purpose flour
2-3 bouillon cubes (beef bouillon for red meat, chicken for poultry)
1 liter of water (add as needed)
Salt to taste

Directions:
Directions:
Meat juices from a roasted chicken, turkey, or beef roast. Remove excess fat, bones, skin, solids from the roaster. If roaster is dry, add enough water to aid in removing the brown ‘candied’ juices from the roasting pan by tipping the pan and working the color off the sides of the pan and into the water using a whisk. How much water to add is dependent on the size of the roast, turkey, or bird. Add two bouillon cubes and dissolve into the juices. In a 16 oz drinking glass, add 4-5 heaping tablespoons of all-purpose flour. A large turkey where you need lots of gravy can be even as much as 6. A small roast may only use 3. Add cold water (about a cup) to the flour and stir the flour with a fork until all the flour is absorbed by the water with no chunks. Add water until it has the consistency of ketchup. What you have in the glass is just like wallpaper paste. It is important that no flour be visible. Work the bottom of the glass to make the flour absorb the water. Chunks of flour will become dumplings in the gravy as they will not dissolve. With the roaster on the stove top and high heat, dump the paste-like flour into the meat juices. Stir vigorously with the whisk. Eventually the bubbling gravy will stop thickening. Remove from heat. Salt to taste. Although I never bother, a strainer can be used to eliminate any chunks of meat, flour, etc., from the gravy.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
6 to 20
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
15 minutes
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Lest I be accused of bragging, let me just state for the record that this is the best gravy you will ever eat! I'm just sayin... It works for beef or poultry. You really can't screw it up as long as you follow some common sense. It's easy to over-salt depending on the meat. Some poultry is filled with ice and salt, which can screw up the whole recipe. The brown candied grunge on the side of the pan is the gravy flavor so work at it to get all the color out of the roaster. I can't tell you the number of times people start gushing compliments when they eat this super simple gravy recipe. It never turns out the same twice because it is so dependent on the cut of meat, how lean it is, how well done, etc.

 

 

 

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