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TRUE HUNGARIAN GOULASH Recipe

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This recipe for TRUE HUNGARIAN GOULASH, by , is from The Standley Family Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Robin Standley
Added: Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 large onion (chopped)
Meat (I use boneless pork chops-she uses chicken or beef cubed into bite-sized pieces)
1 green bell pepper (diced)
1 red bell pepper (diced)
2-3 parsnips (cubed into bite-sized pieces)
2-3 carrots (cubed)
2-3 large potatoes (cubed)
2-3 stalks of celery (cubed)
salt to taste
caraway seeds (cup your hand and cover the bottom with seeds - about 2/3 Tbsps.)
*Hungarian Paprika (you can buy this at Safeway in a red and white can "Pride of Szeged". It is very different from regular paprika.
**Pinching Noodles

Directions:
Directions:
In a large fry pan caramelize the onions, add the meat. Once it is halfway cooked, add the paprika. I just pour till I get a nice red color (about 2-4 Tbsps.) and salt to taste. Add the peppers and cover to simmer while you make the biscuits (see recipe in bread section). In a stock pot, add all the vegetables and cover with water (just until the vegetables are covered). You can also use stock if you prefer. Add the caraway seeds. Cook on medium until the vegetables are done to your liking. Add the meat and simmer while adding the pinching noodles**. Cover and simmer about 10 minutes to ensure the noodles are cooked throughout. Serve with biscuits and enjoy. For pinching noodles, see recipe in "Rice, Grains, Beans, Pasta."

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
This recipe was handed down from my ex-mother-in-law. She is quite possibly one of the greatest cooks I have ever known. My children are 1/2 Hungarian. Their father and his family fled Hungary in 1975 when he was only 6 years old. The government was unstable and persecution was rampant. They fled in the middle of the night taking only what they could carry and came to America in a round about way. Peter (my children's father) became an American citizen in 1988. I learned to cook these recipes from his mother Margit (after our divorce in 1994) so that I could pass some of the culture to our children. We still visit with her, and every time we do she has a table full of treats for us. She does not use standard units of measure nor does she use "store bought," - she's all scratch. This is truly "comfort food" and will take the better part of the day to cook if done right, but it is soooooooo worth it.

 

 

 

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