"As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy, and to make plans."--Ernest Hemingway

Prefect English Gravy!! Recipe

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This recipe for Prefect English Gravy!!, by , is from Joanie's Friends and Family, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Rosemary Richardson
Added: Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
See the very long directions!!!

Directions:
Directions:
1. I am convinced that in the majority of people in Britain there is a latent passion for proper, old-fashioned gravy. I am also convinced that there is a general sense of panic about how to make it. Why else would there be a million and one packets, cubes and jars of granules to enable us to have gravy any old time without actually having to make it? But what exactly is gravy? Originally it described the fat and juices that exuded from a roast during cooking, which were then used as a 'dressing' for the meat and vegetables. The cook's skill now lies in combining what juices the meat produces with other ingredients to make a well-flavoured dressing.

2. Basically there are two ways to make gravy the first is by 'de-glazing', which involves spooning off most of the fat from the juices, then scraping the sides and base of the roasting tin to release all the lovely caramelised bits. Wine or stock (or both) is added, and the whole thing is allowed to bubble and reduce to produce a small amount of concentrated but thin gravy. Or, for slightly thicker gravy for a larger number of people, again most of the fat is spooned off, but then flour is stirred into the juices before the liquid. Either way, the essential point (as with any cooking skill) is to preserve and enhance the flavour. It is best to use a stock that matches the meat that is a beef stock to make gravy for beef, and so on. If you are pressed for time, ready-made stocks are available, but equally a vegetable stock made from potatoes or other vegetables is perfectly all right.

3. It is essential to use a good solid-based roasting tin, so that it can be placed over a direct heat. Remove the meat or poultry from the roasting tin and have a bowl ready. Tilt the roasting tin and you will see the fat separating from the darker juices. Spoon off the fat into the bowl using a large tablespoon you need to leave about 1 tablespoons of fat in the tin. Then use a wooden spoon to scrape the sides and base of the tin to release any crusty bits, which are very important for flavour.

4. Next, place the tin over a direct heat (turned fairly low) and when the fat and juices begin to sizzle, add one rounded tablespoon of flour then quickly dive in with your whisk (a wire balloon whisk is essential to do the job quickly and smoothly). Only plain flour should be used for thickening, as self-raising flour tends to form lumps. Cornflour is not suitable as it produces a rather gelatinous, gluey texture.

5. Blend the flour into the juices with very fast circular movements. Speed is of the essence gentle, faint-hearted stirring is not what's needed here. You should be mixing in the manner of a speeded up film!

6. When you have a smooth paste, begin to add the hot stock a little at a time, whisking briskly and blending with each addition. Turn the heat up to medium and you will find that as the stock is added and it reaches simmering point, the gravy will thicken. Add enough stock to make the gravy as thick or thin as you like, usually 1 pint (570 ml) is about right for 1 rounded tablespoon of flour. If it is too thin, let it bubble and reduce a little. If it's too thick, add a little more liquid. Remember that the liquid should be hot when it's added.

7. When the gravy is bubbling, add a little wine (about half a glass) you could use some that you have opened for the meal and then let it continue to reduce slightly.

8. Finally, taste and season with freshly milled pepper and some salt, then pour the gravy into a warmed jug ready for the table.

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Amazingly, this is the longest Recipe!!! This is especially for Bryan & Tiffany as I remember that they loved my Gravy when they were little!!! Mumsie loved it too!
I took this recipe from a brilliant Cook here in England called Delia Smith. I never used to add wine to my gravy though! I did always cut up a large onion, add that to water and boil until soft and then add this to my gravy!

 

 

 

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