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Homemade Hominy Recipe

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This recipe for Homemade Hominy, by , is from The Hemphill Table, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Eugene Marlowe
Added: Sunday, October 19, 2008

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Open pollinated corn, dried and ready to plant (No genetic altered)
Hardwood ashes (such as oak, hickory, ash, wild cherry, etc.--no poplar or pine) from wood heater
Water

Directions:
Directions:
Run water through the ashes and catch the run-through water in a container. This is lye. (And that's no lie!) The dried corn is cooked in the lye for about 4 hours or until the outside husk is ready to come off. The hominy is then washed using a garden hose with pressure. The washed hominy is cooked in water for another 4 hours or until fully cooked. It is washed again and ready to eat. I cook this in an old washpot over a fire. Keep a close eye on it because if it boils for 2 or 3 minutes, it is burned. It needs to cook just below a boil. If it does boil, I add some water to cool it down.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
If cooked right, the hominy will double the amount of corn.
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
Many hours!
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
I always liked homemade hominy like Mom (Grace) used to make, so around 1995 I did some asking and talking to several people and finally gave it a whirl. One time on a trip, I was at a place which was going to celebrate the way things were done in the past, so I went there and made hominy for them. My name was passed on to others and soon I was getting calls to go to different places for Heritage days. In 2006, there were 12 days of "Hominy Making" planned, including one in Norris, TN at the Museum of Appalachia. Some good uses of hominy include adding to: homemade soup, tacos, chili, tossed salad, blended in a blender until pulp and added to meatloaf. It is a good substitute for macaroni in your favorite mac and cheese dish, and also good when pickled.

 

 

 

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