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Scuppernong Pie Recipe

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This recipe for Scuppernong Pie, by , is from The Getzen Family Recipes and Remembrances, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Beverley & Rufus Getzen
Added: Friday, January 14, 2005

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
3 pints or more Scuppernongs, rinsed (or 2 cups pulp and hulls)
7/8 cup sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons grated orange zest
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
pastry for 2 crust pie

Directions:
Directions:
Pierce each grape with a knife, and squeeze the juice, pulp and seeds into a heavy pot or sauce pan. Put the hulls in a separate container. Add a little water, about 1 or 2 tablespoons per quart of grape pulp and simmer over low heat until seeds begin to separate from pulp - 10 to 12 minutes for a quart pot, somewhat longer for larger quantities. Allow to cool for a few minutes; then separate seeds from pulp by pressing pulp through a sieve with a nylon spatula or scraper. Strain the juice through a jelly bag; then scrape the pulp into the pot with the hulls. Save the juice for making jelly or some other recipe.

Measure 2 1/4 cups of the pulp-hull mixture for one 9-inch pie. (Remaining pulp and hulls can be frozen for future use.) Add about 2 tablespoons of water to the pot; then boil gently with frequent stirring until hulls soften. Add sugar, thickenings, lemon juice and orange zest and cook for another minute or two. Mix well.

Pour into bottom crust, forming a layer about 5/8 inch deep. Dot with butter or margarine. Cover with top crust and seal edges. Cut slits in crust. Bake in preheated oven at 400 for about 40 minutes. Good hot or cool.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
7 to 9
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
When we were kids, my Grandmother Mollie (my dad's mother) always encouraged us to pick wild muscadines so that she could make jelly. She would then treat us to grape-hull pie, made from the peels and pulp that were left over from making jelly. The texture is like a blueberry pie, but the flavor is more complex. A few years after Mollie died, we had an exceptional season of wild grapes, and I asked my mother to make us a pie. Mom was discouraged by the amount of time required to pick out the seeds, and she missed quite a few, so she never tried again.

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture provides encouragement and assistance to farmers who grow scuppernongs and muscadines. They maintain a recipe file for the grapes and, after doing it the hard way once, I learned from one of their recipes an easier technique for removing seeds. This recipe is slightly modified from a grape-hull pie recipe that they provided.

Editor's Note: My Grandfather, Drew (Pop to us), had a large scuppernong arbor on the left side of the house. He loved "bullaces" as he called them.

 

 

 

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