"Leave the gun. Take the cannolis."--Clemenza, in The Godfather

Fried Okra Recipe

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This recipe for Fried Okra, by , is from The Getzen Family Recipes and Remembrances, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Pat (Mealing) Setzer
Added: Wednesday, January 12, 2005

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
2 pounds small, fresh okra, stems trimmed, cut into to inch slices
1 cup cornmeal
cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon Kosher salt, or to taste
teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
1 cup buttermilk
1 cups vegetable oil or lard, or as needed

Directions:
Directions:
Soak cut okra in bowl of ice water for 15 minutes to crisp; drain and pat dry. Combine cornmeal, flour, salt and pepper in a shallow pan (pie tin). Put okra in a large bowl and toss with buttermilk. Lift okra out with a slotted spoon and place in pan of cornmeal, tossing to lightly coat all sides. Transfer okra to a rack set over a baking sheet. Heat cup oil (or lard or bacon grease for "old timers") in a heavy cast iron skillet until almost smoking. Add enough okra to just cover the bottom of the skillet in a single layer, without crowding. Lower heat to medium and cook until golden and crusty on the bottom (about 6 minutes). Turn and cook, tossing okra once or twice, until well browned and crisp on all sides. Remove with a slotted spoon, and drain on paper towel lined baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper. Keep warm in a low oven while cooking the remaining okra in batches. Add more oil if needed to maintain frying level.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
6 to 8
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
If Alex (our grandson) and I could eat our 2 cups of vegetables as fried okra, we would have no trouble at all in getting our daily requirements of fruits and vegetables, but unfortunately I'm afraid that the "fried" makes it wise to limit the serving quite a bit! We like okra any way, just not slimy. I've included three other ways we enjoy okra, and that doesn't even include adding okra to vegetable soup (which is a must). I've read that Africans being brought on slave ships, valued okra so highly that they hid okra seeds in their hair, so they would be able to grow it where ever they were forced to make their new homes. We can thank them for introducing okra to the southern diet.

 

 

 

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