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Uncle Warren’s Double Damn Good Wild Ducks Recipe

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This recipe for Uncle Warren’s Double Damn Good Wild Ducks, by , is from The Sevin Family Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Joe Cagnolatti and Frank Sevin
Added: Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Ingredients:

Six to ten wild ducks

Two medium onions, cut in quarters

Two medium apples, cut in quarters

Few stalks of celery, cut into 3 inch chunks


A little cooking oil

Water

seasonings

Directions:
Directions:
Heat up a 12 to 20 qt black iron pot (jambalaya pot) with a bit of cooking oil in the bottom.

Season six to ten wild ducks, which have been cleaned whole, with the skin on; we’re talking about plucked ducks, preferably puddle ducks such as mallard, pintail, gadwall (grey duck), widgeon, or teal. Sprinkle inside and out with Tony Sacherie’s or use Uncle Warren's favorite combination of salt, pepper, and red pepper.

Stuff the cavities with the quartered onions, celery chunks, and quartered apple. Close the cavity with a safety pin or tie it closed with cotton string.

Place the seasoned ducks into the pot and brown all sides on med high. When browned, lower the fire and add a little water to keep the drippings from burning. When water begins to boil, lower the fire as low as possible and loosely cover them ducks. Sit back and imbibe in a cold beer or something and tell a hunting story or two, or tell about how the ducks in the pot came to be there.

About every ten minutes or twenty minutes, raise the lid, turn the ducks over, and add just enough water to keep the bottom of the pot from burning. Listen for the sizzling (frying) sound, that's when water is needed to avoid burning the bottom.

Cover the pot and imbibe some more, tell another hunting story, and by now the aroma will attract some of the younger members of the family and they will begin to ask questions about everything under the sky. Be patient with them and entertain them. This experience for them will kindle a passion that can burn for a lifetime. And it will preserve the future of hunting and fishing in the family.

After about two hours of slow cooking, the ducks will begin to get tender and fall apart. And someone will say, May yeah, them ducks smell real good”.

Cook another hour. And someone will say, “May yeah them ducks smell damn good.” To which the family patriarch will reply, “Them ducks, they gonna be double damn good.”

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
This recipe requires a lot of time, so the dish is best prepared with a lot of family companionship and comraderie, such as at a duck camp or fishing camp. It is also a time honored excuse for passing along family traditions, the telling of family history and tall tales that get taller with each passing year. The dish is prepared by the family patriarch, with his brothers, and brothers-in-law, with sons and nephews, with grandsons and grand nephews, all gathered around with nothing in particular pressing for time and no obligatory duties to fulfill. If the weather is nice, this dish is best prepared outside, in the yard, or on the camp porch, or on the dock. That way there are plenty of distractions, such as fishing, duck plucking, and nutria shooting to occupy the young and restless. It also does require whatever the family patriarch desires in the form of imbibing, and a cooler full of ice cold beer and soda pop. So break out the lawn chairs and the fishing poles and bb guns.



 

 

 

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