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Dalmatian Favorites Recipe

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This recipe for Dalmatian Favorites, by , is from The Lazy Gourmet, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We'll help you start your own personal cookbook! It's easy and fun. Click here to start your own cookbook!

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Kate Vereschagin

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 pound peeled & deveined scampi or shrimp – first drying them with toweling – in
3 tablespoons olive oil, with
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-pound diced tomatoes, with juice (or use a 1 pound can diced tomatoes)
½ bay leaf
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 cup dry white wine and stir in
½ cup bread crumbs

Directions:
Directions:
DALMATIAN SCAMPI Serves 6
Sauté:
1 pound peeled & deveined scampi or shrimp – first drying them with toweling – in
3 tablespoons olive oil, with
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 cloves garlic, minced
Saute’ for 5 to 10 minutes over low flame - stirring. Add:
1-pound diced tomatoes, with juice (or use a 1 pound can diced tomatoes)
½ bay leaf
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
Simmer for 5 minutes then add:
1 cup dry white wine and stir in
½ cup bread crumbs
Heat but do not cook after adding wine – wine toughens the shrimp.
The end result should be soupy but not liquid. Add bread crumbs if needed – rectify seasoning and serve with good, crusty French bread or Greek bread - dunk bread in sauce – it’s part of the joy when eating provincial soupy dishes!º

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
6
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
December 6, 1974
It has been a long time since I have had the opportunity to visit my old haunts in Europe, so whenever I meet anyone that has recently visited parts that I was familiar with I naturally have to ask how things are over there.
By the same token, when I know anyone that is contemplating a trip I usually try to steer them to the more romantic spots . . . little, cozy hotels, out-of-the-way towns and restaurants frequented by the knowledgeable citizenry as opposed to the tourist oriented spots.
Of course, the chances that the same people are there running the same hostelries are remote . . . still, I’m not taking a way-out chance. Europeans are creatures of habit. The old buildings are seldom torn down and the businesses are usually inherited or passed down to others in the house, so things rarely change much.
Besides, if the local citizenry patronize the place it’s got to be good . . . and cheap! The owners make no pretense at worldliness or fine service, but more than make up for it with caring hospitality and painstaking adherence to traditional standards.
One doesn’t even have to go to any special inn . . . most any will do . . . just watch for the signs. Local businessmen and store-keepers happily chatting over their drinks or concentrating on their food . . . papa fussing over the customers and mamma in the kitchen . . . and, of course, all the lovely aromas.
Travelers that adventure forth always return . . . brimming with delightful experiences.
A short time ago I was introduced to a charming sea captain from Dalmatia who was kind enough to up-date me on all my favorite places on that incomparably beautiful seaboard state of Yugoslavia where I had spent several happy summers in the past.
Gastronomically Dalmatia was always a satisfying experience. The food just about everywhere was unpretentious, wholesome and excellent.
I suddenly got this inspiration. Why not get some recipes from the “horse’s mouth” so to speak? So I got myself invited to the good Captain’s apartment and interviewed his lovely wife to get her favorite Dalmatian recipes.
After some mandatory hospitality (a couple belts of fiery Slivovic, some absolutely fabulous cream-and-nut torte and a cup of Turkish coffee) I settled back and recorded the following recipes that the Captain’s wife read to me from her personal collection of traditional family favorites . . . passed down from her mother, who got them from hers, etc. The Captain injecting advice, the whole while, regarding the proper ways to best appreciate the finesses and what to drink them down with.
I pass them down to you hoping you may adventure into the wonderful world of Dalmatian gastronomy.

 

 

 

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