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Braised Pork in Soy Sauce Recipe

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This recipe for Braised Pork in Soy Sauce, by , is from Education Across Borders Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Sacha Fleming

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Ingredients

1 lb. (450 g.) pork shoulder
1 large piece ginger, about 1 inch (2.5 cm.) on a side
1 Tbsp. (15 ml.) cooking oil
4 Tbsp. (50 g.) sugar
4 Tbsp. (60 ml.) soy sauce
1 cinnamon stick (1/2 tsp. or 5 g. powdered cinnamon may be substituted)
1/2 cup (120 ml.) rice wine (or any other wine)

Directions:
Directions:
This dish is traditionally made with pork belly, but it's hard to find in many supermarkets and it's far fattier than other cuts. There's enough fat in pork shoulder to give the dish a great taste, and still save a few calories and maybe a hardened artery.

Cut the pork shoulder into cubes, about one inch (2.5 cm.) on each side. Smash the ginger with the side of a cleaver; no need to peel it.

Heat a wok and add the oil. When it begins to smoke, add the ginger and then the sugar. Once the sugar has dissolved completely, add the pork. Stir-fry the mixture until most of the liquid has evaporated, but not until it is completely dry. Then add the soy sauce, cinnamon and wine.

Mix well and then cover the wok tightly. Turn the heat down to medium and let simmer for 1/2 hour. Remove and serve.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
6
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
55 minutes
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Chairman Mao believed that the fat in Braised Pork in Soy Sauce had the capa­bility to boost his brainpower. The dish is traditionally regarded as brain food in his native Hunan Province, and it was well-known as the Chairman's favorite. In fact, he insisted that his Hunanese chef cook it for him often, even during his years in Beijing and over the strenuous objection of his personal physicians.

Mao was especially fond of eating this dish before he went into combat — either physical or political — and believed he nev­er lost a battle when well-fed on braised pork.

The Cultural Revolution Cookbook by Sasha Gong and Scott D. Seligman. Copyright 2011. Published by Earnshaw Books.

 

 

 

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