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The Roux Recipe

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This recipe for The Roux, by , is from The kegelman Family Cookbook Project, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
cliff kegelman

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Clarified Butter
Can use regular butter but be careful of browning because of the milk
or any fat u like (IE: bacon grease, vegetable oil and so on)
Flour

Equal parts

Directions:
Directions:
1. Start by melting some butter in a pan. It helps to weigh it first so you know how much flour to use. If you want to be precise, you can use a digital scale, which will come in handy

2.When the butter melts and turns frothy, it's because the water in the butter is starting to cook away. (Clarified butter doesn't have any water in it, so it won't froth.)
Stir in a little bit of all-purpose flour. You can use either a wooden spoon or a whisk.

3.As you continue to stir flour into the butter, you'll see that a thick paste is forming. You'll want to cook it for a few minutes because raw flour has a doughy taste you won't want in your sauce. Cooking the roux for a few minutes helps get rid of that raw flour flavor.
Beyond that, how long you cook the roux depends on what you're using it for. A béchamel sauce calls for a white roux, so you'll only want to cook it for a few minutes until the raw flour taste is gone but the roux is still a pale yellow.
A blond roux, used in white velouté sauces, needs to be a bit darker, so it's cooked a minute or two longer.
A brown roux, used in brown sauces, is the darkest roux, and it's cooked for the longest amount of time. For that reason, you should cook it over a lower heat so that you don't burn it. Some cooks even brown the flour in the oven before adding it to the butter. Just remember that the roux's thickening properties are reduced as it gets darker.

4.It's important that the roux is warm when you add your liquid. Too hot or too cold can both cause problems, leading to a lumpy result. The same goes for your liquid. Warm seems to work best, whether it's stock, milk or anything else. If it's too cold it hardens the butter, and if it's too hot it can separate the roux.

The way roux thickens a liquid is by the starch molecules in the flour absorb the liquid and expand, becoming slightly gelatinous, which creates the effect of thickening the sauce. The fat helps keep the starch molecules separate so that they don't clump up.

You can freeze roux and use it later. Try freezing it in ice cube trays and then transferring to freezer bags. You can even freeze it in muffin pans if you find ice cube trays too small.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
8
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
15
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Roux (pronounced "roo") is one of the basic thickening agents in cooking. Used primarily for bulk up sauces and soups, roux is made from equal parts fat and flour—and the "equal parts" are measured by weight, not volume.

Traditionally, a roux is made with clarified butter, which can be heated to a higher temperature without turning brown. And if you're making a white sauce, you don't want to start off with brown butter. But you can certainly make a roux using ordinary whole butter—just be sure not to let it burn when you're melting it.

In fact, you can use any fat you like. You can use oil, which has a higher smoke point, but not much flavor. You can make a lovely roux from rendered bacon fat, which will add a wonderful pork flavor to sauces and soups. And this classic pan gravy uses fat from the roasted chicken or turkey.

 

 

 

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