Category Archives: General Cookbook

Rating Your Favorite Recipes

StarsCreating a printed personal cookbook on FamilyCookbookProject.com can be a rewarding experience, but your interaction with the website does not have to stop there.

A majority of people who have created cookbooks continue to use the website as an online resource either from their desktop computer or by using our “award-winning” mobile app.

One fun thing to do is to rate the recipes you use from your cookbook.

Rating recipes is easy. Go to the “view recipes by contributor” and find the favorite recipe that you have added to the cookbook so far. Click on the title of the recipe to view it.  Right under the title is something that says “Rate this recipe” and 5 gray stars. To rate this recipe, simply click on the last star of your score. So if you think it is a “5 star” recipe, click on the last star. If it is a “4 star” recipe, click on the fourth star and so on.

You can also click in between to stars to give it a 4.5 star rating!

The next person who views the recipe will see your rating (although they will not know it came from you) and will be able to leave their own rating.

Over time you will see how many people rated your recipes and how much they liked them. It is one more way FamilyCookbookProject.com helps to build a dialog around your recipes.

Give it a try today and invite the others in your cookbook to do the same!

The Family Cookbook Project Named Best Family App By Web Marketing Association

ipadvertical1The Family Cookbook Project has been named the Best Family App in the Web Marketing Association’s 2016 MobileWebAward Competition.  The Family Cookbook Project creates personalized cookbooks for individuals, families, church groups and schools. This is the fourth year that the Family Cookbook Project recognized with a best of industry honor. Designed for use on the Apple iPhone or iPad, the free app can be downloaded Apple iPhone or iPad or Android devices.

The Family Cookbook Project online recipe box allows users to browse and use their recipes. Tools include our blog at your fingertips, latest recipes from our recipe database, notes for in the kitchen, a tip calculator and more! Users can enter their recipes at www.familycookbookproject.com and have access anywhere!

“The Great Family Cookbook Project helps both individuals and families collect and preserve cherished recipes in a printed cookbook that can be passed down from one generation to the next,” says Chip Lowell, Co-Publisher and Technical Director of the Family Cookbook Project.  “However, many people also like to access their recipes on the go from their mobile device. iPhone and iPad users now have an easy to use option to access their family cookbook recipes”.

The Family Cookbook Project Website was started as a project in 2003 to help one family collect and organize a family cookbook. Overwhelming feedback from those who used the website led to its continued development and public launch.  Currently, more than 42,000 families and groups have started family cookbooks using the website and contributors have entered more than 1.2 million individual recipes.

The Family Cookbook Project website provides step by step instructions and tools to help cookbook editors invite others to participate and allow them to enter their favorite recipes directly into the online system.  The editor then simply reviews and edits the recipes, selects printing options, and sends the cookbook to be printed.  The finished printed cookbooks are then received by the editor in only a few weeks.

The Family Cookbook Project Website previously been recognized as the Best Publishing Website in 2013, 2011 and Best Family Website in 2005. It also was recognized in 2015 and 2014 with the Standard of Excellence WebAward. It’s Family Cookbook Recipes App was named Best Publishing App in 2015, 2014 and 2013 by the Web Marketing Association.

“We thank Web Marketing Association MobileWebAward judges for recognizing our work. We will continue to develop ways to help families, schools and church groups create both online and printed cookbooks that become treasured heirlooms,” continued Lowell.

Family Cookbook Project Highlighted in Cape Cod Home Magazine

CCHome Cover SMIn the Winter Issue of Cape Cod Home Magazine, FamilyCookbookProject.com is highlighted in a two page spread by reporter Haley Cote. Haley met with founders Bill Rice and Chip Lowell in Wellfleet this summer and learned how the Great Family Cookbook Project was started 12 years ago and how it has grown to be one of the most successful cookbook making websites on the Internet.

Read the article on creating a family cookbook at CapeCodLife.com

Here is the article if you’d like to read it. Click here if you’d like to subscribe to Cape Cod Home Magazine,

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How To Bold Text In Your Family Cookbook Project Recipe

Html-tagHave you ever wanted to call everyone’s attention to a specific line an a recipe?

Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!

Add ingredients in this specific order!

Do not preheat your oven!

Certain directions are critical to the outcome of a favorite dish and Family Cookbook Project as made it easy if you want to bold your text in a recipe.  You just have to learn HTML or Hyper Text Markup Language, the programming language of every website on the Internet.

Now before you say “I’m not a computer programmer, I can barely turn on my laptop””. It’s super easy for what you want to do.

In directions, comments and ingredients when you are adding a new recipe, you can use simple HTML tags like:

<b>BOLD</b>
<i>Italic</i>
<u>Underline</u>

Replace the word between the tags with what you want to appear in that format. It’s as simple as that!

For example <b>Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!</b> looks like this Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!

If you use Do not cook longer than 10 minutes! it will look like this Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!

and if you use <u>Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!</u> it will look like this Do not cook longer than 10 minutes!

The most important thing to remember is that all tags start with “<>” and end with a “</>”. If you forget the /> then every thing else in your recipe will be based on the tag you used. Don’t forget your “</>”!

Family Cookbook Project is always looking for ways to make your favorite recipes come to life for you and your family.

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Two New Pinterest Boards

Pin1Pinterest is a great social sharing site that is very popular with people sharing recipes. The Family Cookbook Project has been sharing some of the best recipes from our editors for many years and recently we introduced two new boards for your enjoyment.

Let-us Eat Salads – This is a great collection of photos of every different kind of salad there is. From fruit salads, pasta salads to more traditional lettuce salads and salad dressings.

Crockpot Lovers – If you love the ease and great recipes that use a crockpot, this board is for you! Crockpots recipes can run the gambit, from interesting main courses to wonderful deserts.

These two new Family Cookbook Pinterest boards join our other boards including: Family BBQ and Grilling Recipes, It’s Better with Bacon, Foods from Around the World, and Food Guys Love.

Do you have a suggestion for a new Pinterest Board? Please let us know!

Bill Rice is Co-Publisher of the Great Family Cookbook Project, a website that helps families and individuals collect and share food memories.

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Four New Covers Added to Family Cookbook Design Center

At Family Cookbook Project, we are always trying to improve our offerings to our members. We are please to announce four new pre-designed cookbook covers that you can choose when designing your own personal cookbook.

The two religious-themed covers are in response to our members requests and for many church communities that use our cookbooks as an effective fundraiser for their various ministries and charitable activities.

The new Children’s Choir is appropriate for any church or school choir group or anyone who simply loves music.

Here are the new covers:

New Cookbook Covers 6-8-16

 

We are working hard to continue to bring you additional professionally designed cookbook covers that you can use on your own family cookbook project.

Recipe Standard Measurements

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For many generations, recipes were handed down by word of mouth from mother to daughter. Recipes consisted of a little of this and a smidgin of that. The food always came our great – or at least that is what we told out mothers! Today things are different. Computers make is easy to write down our recipes and share them with friends and family members over the Internet. However it is important to remember that cooking has a language of its own. It is a language of ingredients and measurements and directions. I believe the most important of these is measurements. If we did not have standard measurements for cooking, “T” could be a teaspoon, a tablespoons, a thimble full or a truck load! Here are a list of Standard Measures Abbreviations commonly used in recipes.

teaspoon……………………… tsp.
tablespoon…………………… tbsp. or T.
cup…………………………….. c.
quart…………………………… qt.
ounce…………………………. oz.
pint…………………………….. pt.
gallon…………………………. gal.
inch…………………………….. in.
pound………………………….. lb.
milliliter…………………………. ml
liter……………………………….. L
milligram……………………….. mg
gram……………………………… g
kilogram ……………………….. kg
millimeter……………………… mm
centimeter…………………….. cm
meter……………………………. m
Celsius…………………………… C
Fahrenheit……………………. F

Another important thing about standard measurements is that they don’t work if you don’t use them! Including an ingredient in your recipe without a specific amount is likely to leave someone trying the recipe for the first time scratching their head and wondering what to do. Remember know one will know unless you include it in your recipe.

Bill Rice is Co-Publisher of the Great Family Cookbook Project, a website that helps families and individuals collect and share food memories. Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest!

Why Blank Pages Are Important In Your Family Cookbook

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One of the questions we get a lot as Cookbook Publishers is “how do I remove the blank pages in my cookbook?”

It seems that when people preview their family cookbook on FamilyCookbookProject.com, they see the cover, then a blank page, then the title page, then another blank page, and so on. They want those blank pages eliminated to lower the cost of printing.

In publishing, especially cookbook publishing, a cookbook needs to be laid out in a specific way in order for the most important pages to be on the right side when the book is opened. Think about it, Whenever you open a book, the title page is the first thing you see and it is always on the right page of a two page spread. Same goes for the Introduction, Table of Contents and the section dividers.

On FamilyCookbookProject.com, if you create a preview cookbook PDF, you want to open it in your Adobe Reader program and select the option to view “Facing Pages” or “Double-up” (look under the View menu), you’ll see how the pages back up to each other.

Now with that said, there is no reason why those pages have to be blank. The inside front cover can have a family photo photo or bio of the cookbook editor. The same goes for other blank pages as well. If your introduction is one page and after it is a blank page, consider writing more, adding a photo or even making the text larger to fill up that extra space.

One benefit form using FamilyCookbookProject.com is that we provide a complete set of handy kitchen information that can be used on the back of the recipe category dividers with the touch of a button.

Bill Rice takes more than 20,000 photos a year and is Co-Publisher of the Great Family Cookbook Project, a website that helps families and individuals collect and share food memories. Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest!

How Many Recipes Does My Cookbook Need?

spiralbinderclosedOne question every cookbook editor wants to know is how many recipes should my cookbook have? Too many and printing costs are higher, not enough and the cookbook is not as valuable. What’s a family cookbook editor to do?

Looking at the thousands of cookbooks we have printed over the past decade, there is no real number of recipes that make up a good cookbook  – you have what you have.  We have printed cookbooks with just 15 great recipes and as many as 1200!  However, that 1200 recipe book was 750 pages – HUGE!

The average size seems to be around 150 recipes and that is why we use that number in our cost calculator.

When a great cookbook has less recipes, often the editor includes other content to augment the food offerings. Photos of each dish, a section of family photos, a family tree or family stories about people remembered can really add value to a smaller cookbook.

Larger cookbooks can be impressive simply by the number of recipes it contains. However, since printing cost is directly related to the number of pages that need to be printed, it is important to be mindful of your design choices when choosing your layout options.

At the end of the day, your cookbook is exactly that – your cookbook. You need to balance the number and quality of the recipes included with the needs of your family.

The most important part of your recipe – the title

495379recipepic65541-Jacques-Torres-Secret-Chocolate-Chip-Cookie-RecipeYour recipe title is the single most important element of your recipe. This is because your title is a headline, and the headline in any type of content has one special and powerful property.

Think about how you read a cookbook looking for a recipe to try.  You don’t start in the front and read every page like a novel then pick the one you want. No, you scan the pages looking for a photo or recipe title that catches your eye and looks interesting!

Of all the elements in your recipe, the title has the greatest power for grabbing your readers’ attention and the greatest responsibility for enticing them to continue and read your recipe It follows that the better your title, the higher the chance of turning a recipe scanner into a recipe reader (and ultimately a recipe user).

For a recipe title to be effective it needs to consider several things:

Grab Attention – Like any headline you need to grab the readers attention.

Describe the food being prepared – “Gruel” is one of my son’s favorite dishes, however it no one outside the family knows what it is. Including the main ingredient of the dish and even how it us prepared make the title more useful. “Baked Hamburger Gravy” would be a more descriptive title for our gruel.

Be different and unique – If you have seen the recipe title before, it does not belong on your recipe!

Include the source – In family cookbooks, certain people are associated with certain recipes. Grandma’s Apple Pie or Lou’s Lemon Bars help the reader image exactly what dish you are referring to. It just does not help anyone who is not at family gatherings!

Sell the sizzle as well as the steak – This means to highlight the benefit, the reason why this recipe is worth making.

Recipe titles that address cooking and eating needs are more likely to seduce the reader into the recipe itself. A good title clearly shows the reader which of their cooking and eating needs the recipe addresses. Every readers’ need is different. For example, it could be for something indulgent or something low fat, or something quick and easy or something sophisticated and thus involved, or something refined or something rustic.

Consider the following recipe titles: ‘Soft and Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies’, ‘Quick ‘n’ Easy Chocolate Chip Cookies’, ‘Grandma’s Favorite Chocolate Chip Cookies’, ‘Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies’. Notice how each title addresses a different need and even appeals to different audiences. Quite simply, as the chocolate chip cookie examples show, it’s all down to the words you choose for your title.

With a little thought and imagination, your recipe titles can stand out and make your readers give your recipes the attention they deserve.

Bill Rice is Co-Publisher of the Great Family Cookbook Project, a website that helps families and individuals collect and share food memories. Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest!