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Squaw Bread and/or Fair Elephant Ears Recipe

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This recipe for Squaw Bread and/or Fair Elephant Ears, by , is from Our Family Cookbook Project 2006, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
John Thorson- Valdosta, GA
Added: Saturday, March 25, 2006

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
2 c.flour
1 tsp. salt
3 tsp. baking power
1 c. water

Directions:
Directions:
Mix ingredients and let sit for 10-15 minutes.

Break off a ball of dough about golf ball size and pat out no thicker than 1/4 inch. (In some tribal traditions a hole is always made in the center which has spiritual significance.)

Fry in deep hot oil to a light golden brown, turn once to brown both sides. (Oil is hot enough if a small test piece of dough dropped in the oil begins cooking almost immediately and rises to the top.)
Drain bread well and pat with paper towel to remove excess oil. Keep covered in a bowl while cooking to keep bread warm...PS: Used this way, it's eaten like bread with soup, stew, etc. To create a sweet "Elephant Ear"...have a bowl of sugar with cinnamon mixture near by to roll the hot bread in..delicious!

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
several
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
about 20 minutes
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Several years ago as an executive with the Boy Scouts of America, two adult volunteers and myself were invited guests to an authentic American Indian Pow Wow in Wyoming. This recipe was one of many memories brought back from that event.
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Funny Story: "A Norwegin ended up as a farmer in Georgia. On his property he had a nice pond around which he'd planted fruit trees. One year, when the oranges were ripe, he took an empty five-gallon pail to pick some fresh fruit. As he neared his pond and trees, he heard the sound of giggles coming from the pond. He was surprised to find several co-eds from the local state college skinnydipping in his pond.
When the girls saw him approaching, they ducked down into deeper water. One yelled out, 'We ain't getting out of here till you leave!'
Frowning and holding up his empty five-gallon pail, the Norse farmer hollered back, 'I didn't come down here to watch you gals skinnydip. I just came down to FEED THE ALIGATOR!'"

 

 

 

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