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Chicken Satay, "Satay Gai" Recipe

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This recipe for Chicken Satay, "Satay Gai", by , is from Chef Anna's Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  

Added: Monday, November 7, 2005

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 teaspoon coriander seed
1 teaspoon cumin seed
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger
1 pound chicken breasts, skinned, boned, and cut into bite sized pieces.
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon curry powder
pinch turmeric powder (as only a colorant, so very little!)
8 tablespoons coconut milk
3 tablespoons palm sugar


Peanut Sauce:

4 ounces of roasted (unsalted) peanuts
3-4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 ounce chopped onion
1-2 tablespoon red or massaman curry paste
1 teaspoon fish sauce
8 tablespoons coconut milk
4-6 teaspoons lime juice (to taste).
2-3 teaspoons palm sugar.

Directions:
Directions:
The chicken is beaten flat, using the flat of the blade of a heavy cleaver or using a meat tenderizing
mallet. You can also use a rolling pin. The coriander and cumin are toasted and then crushed in a mortar and pestle. The ingredients are then
combined to form a marinade, and the chicken is marinated overnight. The pieces of chicken are then threaded on the 12" satay sticks, loosely folding them in half and piercing through the folded meat to form a loose gather. The completed sticks are then grilled, broiled or barbequed on fairly high heat (they taste best done over charcoal, as they absorb the smoke). Turn them regularly and brush them liberally with the remaining marinade.
Cooking should take between 5 and 10 minutes depending on the heat of your cooker.

Peanut Sauce:

First grind or crush the peanuts to a fairly fine powder. Then combine them with the remaining ingredients (except the lime juice), to form a smooth sauce. If the sauce is too thick, you can thin it with a little chicken stock. Now add the lime juice, tasting as you progress to check the balance of flavors is correct. Note use red curry paste with beef or pork satay, massaman (as above) with chicken. If you are doing shrimp satay then use half the quantity of massaman paste.

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Satay is originally an Indonesian/Malay dish, but it has been in Southern Thailand for a very long time. This is a Thai version. You can of course also make the same recipe with chunks of beef or pork, or large prawns that are usually deheaded and the skewer threaded lengthwise down the body.

 

 

 

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