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Irish in Iowa Potato Bread Recipe

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This recipe for Irish in Iowa Potato Bread, by , is from Endangered Recipes: Too Good To Be Forgotten, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Pat McCoy
Added: Monday, August 1, 2005

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
7 c. flour
1 T. active dry yeast
1 medium potato, pared, cubed, and boiled (8 oz.)
2 1/2 c. boiling water from potato (approximate amount),
Half stick cool butter
1 or 2 T. salt
1 T. sugar

Directions:
Directions:
This recipe works well with a Kitchen Aid mixer. This recipe can also be used for two loaves of bread, or 2 pans of cinnamon rolls.
Boil the potato first and allow to cool to between 105 and 115 degrees. Dissolve the yeast for 5 - 10 minutes in 1/2 cup of the warmed potato water with the sugar and then wisk together. Add the remaining water and then slowly begin adding the flour -- about a cup at a time until it is completely absorbed. Add the salt. Mash a few pieces of the potato and add to the dough. Continue to beat (or knead) for about 10 minutes. At this point, your dough should have a nice smooth texture and if using the mixer, it should not be sticking to the bowl. If it is sticking to the bowl, add a teaspoon of flour at a time until the dough works its way up on the hook. Stop every minute or so and knock the flour off the hook.
Add the half stick of butter in chunks. This will appear to undo all the work of the previous steps, but fear not, if you keep beating (or kneading) it will work its way into the dough. Continue beating for about 5 minutes.
Cover with a piece of greased plastic wrap in a large buttered bowl and allow to rise for 60 to 90 minutes. The dough will double in size. Empty the dough out on a well floured work surface and gently bring to a ball shape. (Save your plastic wrap). Using a knife or dough tool, divide the dough into 3 equal pieces. Put one back in the bowl and cover while working with the others. Each piece of dough should be divided in half, and then each piece in half again, and then half again -- to make 8 equal pieces. In total, you will have 24 pieces. Working quickly, work each piece in your hands to make a small loaf shape. Pinch the ends to make sure you have a well formed mini loaf. Begin laying the pieces in a buttered 9 x 13 pan. The biscuits can touch each other, but don't crowd them. After you have completely filled the pan, cover with the plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour. The "biscuits" will nearly double in size.
Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Bake the bread for about 30 - 40 minutes. The best method to determine when it is done is to take its temperature -- the center of a biscuit should be 200 degrees - no more. When you've tested the temperature and achieved 200 degrees, remove immediately and place on a cooling rack. While the bread is cooling, take two tablespoons of butter and while holding with a piece of wax paper, move the butter over the entire pan of bread. The butter will add some extra flavor and turn the tops of the biscuits a golden brown.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
24
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
About 2 hours
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
This bread recipe was used for several generations by the McCoy family in Iowa. We call them biscuits, although they are not traditional biscuits and are yeast based rather than soda based. The bygone era of family farming was one of "many hands" and they all needed to be fed three times per day. These pull-apart biscuits were easily served to hungry farmhands; they are hearty and good with any kind of meat or spread. In the days before mixers, my grandmother, Lizzy McCoy would use 5 pounds of flour and turn out pan after pan of these "biscuits" or cinnamon rolls.

 

 

 

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