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Chile Cheese Quiche Bites Recipe

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This recipe for Chile Cheese Quiche Bites, by , is from Brues, Let's Eat, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Carolyn Brue Off
Added: Thursday, April 9, 2009

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
1 cube melted butter
10 beaten eggs
7 oz. can diced Ortega chiles
2 cups small curd cottage cheese
cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 pound grated jack cheese

Directions:
Directions:
Mix the ingredients together, in the given order. Pour into a greased 9x13 baking dish.

Bake for 15 minutes at 400 F, then reduce heat to 350 F and continue cooking for an additional 30 minutes.

Cool for 10-15 minutes before cutting into squares. If using for an appetizer, one inch squares are best.

Note: This may be prepared up to a day ahead of time, refrigerated, and reheated at the last moment. It is also good served at room temperature.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
8-12
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
15 minutes plus cooking time.
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Eggs, cheese, and flour (for a crust)---when did we learn to call this combo of ingredients quiche? Of course, in the 1940s and early 1950s on a farm in Fiscus, Iowa all of these items were available.

Eggs were a source of protein that we were served (being served meant that Mom cooked and served) quite regularly. Poached eggs on toast for breakfast-how was there possibly time to prepare poached eggs on toast for six people before the school bus arrived at 6:45 am? BTW, those same six people also shared one bathroom!

Eggs also have a place in legendary family tales. Granddad (Nels) had a way of cooking eggs that he must have taught his son (Les) to enjoy. This method of cooking begins with some bacon being fried-not too crisply. "Do not drain the pan" before dropping in an egg. Be certain that the pan is very hot so that the bottom of the egg will be crispy brown but do not overcook. The yolk should remain very soft!

The restorative power of eggs should not be overlooked. During the middle 1980s, at which time Mom (Ruby) was recovering from cancer's effects, several different procedures for scrambling eggs emerged. While doing something to encourage her to eat and regain her health, members of the clan each had a special and unique way of preparing scrambled eggs. Time has erased my memory of which one of us had which method, but they included the need to add milk to the eggs to make them creamier; add water to the eggs to make them fluffier; add nothing to the eggs to keep the natural texture. In retrospect, the act of preparing eggs was probably more beneficial to the respective cook who felt the calming effect of being active in the healing process!

Cheese was an ingredient which I barely remember until I was forty years old. Perhaps that was because of a pizza episode in the late 1940s or early 1950s. Pizza was new on the scene in Fiscus, Iowa-in fact, it wasn't even on the scene yet! A box-mix was available which included grated Parmesan cheese to be sprinkled on the tomato sauce which was spread onto a thin crust. The aroma of the melting Parmesan cheese was a surprise to all of us-not exactly a pleasant surprise! Granddad Brue said that he was quite sure that he did not care to eat any of that "peacha" and Dad said that he agreed with his father this time! (More than half a century changes even food tastes. Mom and Dad both enjoy pizza today-half with meat and the other half with meat also!)

Flour was also a staple in the Brue household. It seems that about 50 pounds of flour must have been used on a weekly basis. Mom baked bread many times a week, many loaves each time. There were also sweet rolls available nearly every day-another big use of flour. It was a common sight to see a dozen big cinnamon rolls disappear in a ten-minute feeding frenzy. But, not to worry, another dozen of orange rolls would then appear on the table! Those rolls, plus sandwiches, were served at 9:00 am and again at 3:00 pm to whomever was working on that day.

This seems to be a spot to interject a quote from my maternal grandfather (Ralph Elwell) when speaking of his middle child Ruby, "That girl sure can cook." No one has disputed that statement!

But I digress. The recipe follows.

Quiche is said to have evolved in the area of eastern France that borders on Germany. The word has its roots in kucken, German for cake.Quiche is usually a savory open-faced pie made with an unsweetened pie or tart crust. It is often served as a part of a meal-or a meal itself. However, when made without a crust it becomes a hearty appetizer!

 

 

 

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