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Perceptions on Food/ Homemade Cornbread Recipe

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This recipe for Perceptions on Food/ Homemade Cornbread, by , is from The Jones Family Cookbook, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Martha Heflin
Added: Friday, April 3, 2009

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Mama and Daddy never had elegant meals but they always had plenty. If anybody came at meal time they invited them to eat.
Daddy wanted three meals a day.

For breakfast he had eggs, bacon, biscuits, gravy, oatmeal, coffee, and milk. We often had peanut butter and syrup with biscuits...still Margie's favorite. If we didn't have syrup Mama made sugar syrup.

Daddy took sandwiches in his lunch everyday, so if he was home at noon, he did not ever want sandwiches.

Mama's one treat night was on Saturday evening. We had fried bologna or Post Toasties and that was "her day off".

She made up for it on Sunday with a huge meal.

I think Daddy was partially responsible for my overeating problem -- He would say, "Come on, you didn't have enough to eat, have a little more, have another piece of cake."

Mama made a cake nearly every day.

There was always something to eat.

Directions:
Directions:
My job was Cornbread:
1 cup flour
1 cup corn meal
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 egg
1 cup milk

Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
350 to 400 degrees 20 minutes until brown.
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
And there was milk...Daddy brought a bucket full of milk to the house every night. It was our job to strain the milk through a white piece of soft cloth. The goal was to get "whatever" out of it. Then we poured it into a big gallon jar and put it in the "ice box."
The cream came to the top--a good inch at the top of a gallon of milk. We drank it straight. The milk bucket was the last to be washed after all the dishes. So if the bottom of the bucket was dirty--the other dishes were safe. Our children would die, but we didn't.

 

 

 

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