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Tiramisu Recipe

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This recipe for Tiramisu, by , is from Brues, Let's Eat, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Nord Brue
Added: Saturday, January 31, 2009

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
8 extra large egg yolks
8 T granulated sugar
6 egg whites
¼ Cup plus 2T Kahlua
16 oz Mascarpone
36 ladyfingers (Torino or Savoiardi Brand) Dry is Best
2 ½ Cups of triple strength espresso (I use three T’s instant) cooled to room temp.
¼ Cup good cocoa powder or other dark chocolate to grate

Directions:
Directions:
1. Beat the egg yolks and sugar using whisk attachment until thick and pale, 4-5 minutes with Kitchenaid. Add 2 T of Kuhlua while mixing. Add Mascarpone and slow mixer just to blend thoroughly and smooth out lumps in cheese, not to beat.

2. Using a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until slightly stiff. (I use 3-3½ minutes on “6” with the Kitchenaid. The egg whites lighten the dish (some recipes omit them) and if a lighter dish is desirable use more egg whites or beat them until stiffer. Incorporate the egg whites into the mixture with a spatula and turn just until well mixed.

3. Pour the espresso and ¼ cup Kahlua in a flat dish in order to roll the dry ladyfingers in the liquid. Warmer espresso speeds the process but tends to make the ladyfingers fall apart. The goal is soaked but not soggy. In an 8x10 pan (or larger if egg whites are stiff), arrange the soaked ladyfingers side-by-side on the bottom of the serving dish.

4. Pour 1/3 (or ½ if using large serving dish) of the mascarpone mixture over the ladyfingers and smooth with a spatula. Repeat the process to make two additional layers or if using a larger serving dish just two layers. Smooth the mixture and dust the top with the cocoa and chill for 6-8 hours in the refrigerator to blend flavors.


Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
8
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
1 Hour plus 8 Hours Refrigeration
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Writing a family cookbook brings to the fore lots of little issues. Suzanne and I were traveling from Vermont back to Florida and marooned in the Philadelphia airport when Marget called. “What was I doing?” she asked, and I said working on my recipe files. I’ll admit that’s a pretty weird thing to be doing in the Philadelphia Airport and so I told her it was in pursuit of the family cookbook project Alexia and I started yakking about during Alexia’s visit to Florida. If anyone in the family has reason to wonder why she is not front and center in a cookbook collaborative it is Marget.

Marget is without doubt the most serious culinarian among us. Her “Focus on the Future” at age 18 in her campaign for the state legislature in Vermont was followed by her “Focus on Food” Actually her focus on food pre-dated the campaign and at an early age Marget whipped up the most impossible concoctions. At the age of 19 she planned, cooked, and served with a team she assembled a corporate banquet for 45 people at Oakledge. The finale was a 17 layer strawberry confection

Marget asked, “Should I be offended?” and noted that taking offense is an easy thing to do.

We talked further and she said the “Nord” dishes for the cookbook should include pork with cabbage and Tiramisu. Actually she added she had been the first in the family to make and serve Tiramisu and she even pinpointed the boyfriend who had been there when she first served it. Well my memory is not as sharp as it used to be and taking Marget on directly is dicey in the best of times for me. She’s pretty quick. I shortly accepted that she made it first. That was painful but it was even more painful when I heard her say that I had adapted my recipe from Italian Cooking for Dummies. Not that I have an aversion to ICFD—I use it often but still, to be reminded hurt.

I really had been quite invested in this Tiramisu (“Pick me up” or “carry me up” in Italian) partly because it is an important product for Franklin Foods and we sold xxxxx pounds of Mascarpone last year and Costco uses it in their version of Tiramisu. So, I contributed at least a bit to this recipe—that’s my story and I’m sticking with it.

One thing about Marget’s cooking is authenticity and in Tiramisu that includes raw eggs. Eggs are pretty safe today but check with your guests to make sure nobody has a compromised immune system. If you feel safe to go ahead you will find this a decadent dessert and a fitting end to any Italian menu.

Serve with Vin Sant the ethereal dessert wine of Tuscany

 

 

 

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