"No man in the world has more courage than the man who can stop after eating one peanut."--Channing Pollock

Slow Baked Ham Recipe

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This recipe for Slow Baked Ham, by , is from Brues, Let's Eat, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Nord Brue
Added: Saturday, January 31, 2009

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  

1 8-10 lb uncooked shank portion ham
˝ cup water

Directions:
Directions:
1. Pre-heat oven to 325°
2. Unwrap ham, rinse it, and be sure to remove plastic bone cover
3. Place ham, cut section down in a light colored baking pan that is only slightly larger than the ham
4. Add ˝ cup water
5. Put in pre-heated oven for 1 hour
6. Turn the oven down to 275° and let roast for another 2-3 hours. You will know that it is down when the meat retracts from the shank bone and the sections start to separate.
7. When the ham is done to your satisfaction, remove it from the oven and pour the drippings into a large Pyrex container. When cooled, refrigerate for later use in the soup.
8. Tent ham with aluminum foil and let rest for ˝ hour to 2 hours, then slice and serve
9. As soon as the ham has cooled refrigerate in a large plastic bag to preserve freshness

Now the eternity begins: Two people and a ham. Sandwiches will only take you so far. Ham and Swiss on rye with Honey Mustard and Mesclun is a personal favorite and grilled ham and cheese will satisfy another day. When the easy slicing has passed try ham fried rice where East meets West in a most pleasant manner.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
As many as needed
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
3-4 Hours
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
As I think about it, this recipe has the shortest ingredient list of any in my files. In fairness, if you have a steam injected oven you can even omit the water. Why not try it that way? The processors have added water and if your package reads like my recent ham you will have noticed that the package includes 23% added water. Your mission is to slowly bake out that excess water and gently roast the ham in a moist oven until the meat has become tender and juicy and ready to fall off the bone.

Ham, of course is nothing more or less the cured hindquarter of a pig. There are two ways to cure a ham—dry or wet. Dry is the route to the elegant world famous delicacies of Italy’s prosciutto di Parma, Spain’s jamon Iberico, Gemany’s Westpalia, and the fabled Chinese Jinhua which I have read about but never had the chance to taste. In the United States of America it is the Country or Virginia hams that are dry cured and something of an acquired taste. But no, I am not talking about these dry cured super expensive items but rather the wet cured mass produced American hams which still can often be found for less than $1.00 per lb.

After this ham has been baked and lost the excess water and a little more of its natural juice you will have concentrated the flavors wonderfully and any resemblance it bears to what you buy in deli department at the grocery store is merely in the name.

 

 

 

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