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Homegrown: Food and Flowers Recipe

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This recipe for Homegrown: Food and Flowers, by , is from Cooking With The Cousins, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Otis Bundy
Added: Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
'pole beans in the corn field"

Directions:
Directions:

ALONG THE GARDEN FENCE: Sweet peas grew along the garden fence and jonquils along the road, for decoration.

GROWN IN THE GARDEN: We'd plant onions in the fall (potato onions were strong). In the spring they would be ready to eat. We would eat onions and a pone of cornbread before supper was ready.

In February or early March, cabbage. Then potatoes, corn and beans (Bunch Greasy, pole beans in the cornfield).

We saved bean seeds from year to year and big onions to make little onions to eat. Little onions were planted to produce big onions to eat.

STONE CELLAR: Unexpected company was no problem. Mother didn't have to go to the store because the food was already there, home canned goods in the stone cellar. Beans, tomatoes, apples and peaches!

FIRST FRIED SPRING CHICKEN FOR BREAKFAST: The hen that began to set first was a great hen! Hens would set 21 days (brood). Two hens might lay eggs at the same time. Chicks from one hen would be placed with the first hen. (Aunt Mary would cut the hen's bill so she would raise the other hen's chicks.) We would eat the first mature chick for breakfast (tender). We watched out for hawks, weasel, mink or fox.

CHICKEN CALLING RAIN: During time of rain, as the dark clouds moved in, the women of the community would go out and call "Chick, chick, chick" to get the chicks in ahead of the rain ("chicken calling rain"). If they got caught in the rain, they would bring them in to dry them off. Plymouth Rock, Dominecker (Barred Plymouth Rock), White Leghorn, White Jersey Giant. Rhode Island Red (not enough feathers on tail and it would be red). They would eat tomatoes and their head would be red too. A mink got one of the banty hens. Elva got the ax and the mink's head was cut off. "You got my little banty, and now I have YOU!"

 

 

 

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