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The Day the Hay Stacker pulled Babe Recipe

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This recipe for The Day the Hay Stacker pulled Babe, by , is from The Wenstad/Satrang Family Cookbook , one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Pete Wenstad
Added: Saturday, January 26, 2008

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Grandpa Wenstad
The Wenstad kids
Babe the trusty horse

Directions:
Directions:
Pete's memory of the day the hay stacker pulled Babe:

* It was a hot sticky day in August. So still you had to breathe twice to tell if you were getting air. Making hay always made the day hotter. The hay is hot, the air is hot and you are hot.
Laurel was in the stack, John was raking and Dad was running the bull rake and I was with Babe on the stacker (Cheryl was lucky. She wasn't in the hay field that day.)
We had what is called an over shot stacker. My job was to hook Babe to the cable that pulled up the stacker. I would take her by the bridle and lead her forward, pulling the hay up and dumping it on the stack. Laurel would then spread it and pack it. Dad would bring the hay with the bull rake and put it on the stacker and Babe would dump it.
Dad went into a small meadow for hay and decided to get it all in one load. While when he came out of that meadow, he had all that hay and even as an eight year old kid, I knew that Babe and I were in a lot of trouble. He put all that hay on the stacker and I started Babe up. She got about three quarters of the way up and I was giving her extra discipline to let her know it was a heavy load. As she dug in to dump the load the pully broke, she was airborn and I was too. She was pawing the air trying to go forward while she was being pulled backwards and banging me with her hooves while I was dangling by the bit.
The stacker hit the ground losing half the hay. Now Dad's off the tractor and that's never good. He doesn't know the pully broke and no one else does either. He grabs a fork, yells at Babe and hits her on the butt. He tells her to pull that load up. Babe is a little rattled and I am a little upset because Babe doesn't need to be hit. She takes off jumping, pawing for the ground, jumping forward, coming off the ground, pawing and trying to pull that load up while I am dangling like a cuckoo. And I am getting banged around by her hooves. Well, she dumped that load and there wasn't even half of it left. The stacker all went over backwards with Laurel in the stack. Then Dad saw that the pully was broke and I thought we would get to go home that hot summer day. But Dad went to a neighbors and got a pully and we stacked hay all that day.
Dad being the labor manager that he was he made some changes the next day. He put Laurel on the bull rake, John stayed on the rake (He needs a good man to handle the horse in case of a runaway). I got to be on the stack, a real man's job and Cheryl got to hang on the bit of Babe. And I learned that no one had to hit Babe on the butt to make her obey. And that is a story about a whole lot of horse and a whole lot of hay.


 

 

 

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