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Sprouting Seeds Recipe

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This recipe for Sprouting Seeds, by , is from At The Roylance's Table, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Patty Roylance
Added: Sunday, November 4, 2007

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Sprouting is a simple process and greatly increases the nutritional value of grains, beans, and seeds. Not only do the seeds increase in food value, but they also develop nutrients that were not present before in measurable quantities, such as vitamin C. In addition, the starch in these foods changes to simple sugar, which makes sprouts easier to digest and a delight to eat raw. Wheat sprouts are particularly sweet when they first start to sprout and can be made into a grain honey. Some of the larger sprouts, such as soybeans, require some cooking. Steam or saute them a few minutes.
Add sprouts to salads, soups, casseroles, and sandwiches. Cook them with vegetables or eggs or grind them and use them in breads. Sprouts will quicken the leavening action in yeast breads and wil1 help unleavened breads rise. When fresh sprouts are included, unleavened bread dough will rise in half the time it normally takes.
Almost all whole seeds, grains, and dried beans will sprout. Alfalfa seeds and mung beans are favorites, but try some of the following: sunflower, radish, lettuce, carrot, fenugreek, rye, wheat, oats, lentil, soybean. Buy only untreated seed for sprouting to avoid the poisons often used in seed treatment. Untreated seeds often have a better germination rate, too. Do not eat potato sprouts; they are toxic.
Grow your sprouts in any container suitable for keeping food or in a commercial sprouter, but sprouting is simplest in a wide-mouth glass jar. Sprouting is easy and fun when you can watch the sprouts grow. Put one tablespoon of seed in a pint jar. Cover the seed with water-spring if available. Place a piece of cheesecloth or nylon netting over the top and secure it with a rubber band. After soaking overnight, drain off the water. (This is excellent for watering your plants). Leaving the cheesecloth intact, run warm water in the jar. Rinse off the seeds, invert the jar at an angle, and let the seeds drain until evening when you should rinse them once again. Continue rinsing the seeds-morning and night-more often in a dry climate, until the sprouts have reached the desired length. * At this point, put the sprouts in cold water briefly and separate them so they will be easier to use later. Use the sprouts immediately or store them in a tightly covered jar in the refrigerator. Eat them as soon as possible, for they start losing nutritional value a few days after they are stored.

* Consult the Sprouting Chart (below) for the optimum length for each variety of sprout.

Sprouts will grow in the dark or in the light, but keep them out of direct sunlight.They will be greener and prettier if allowed to grow in the light. In either case, when they are almost ready, place them in direct sunlight for a few hours to develop the chlorophyll and a nice green color.

Directions:
Directions:
Sprout in Days:
Alfalfa seeds, 3-4
Radish, 3-4
Clover, 3-4
Garbanzo, 3
Lentils, 2-3

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
Believe it, I use to sprout a lot of seeds. I've become extremely lazy, since they're so readily available. But just in case your in need, this is good info to have.

 

 

 

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