"The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been found."--Calvin Trillin

Vinerterta Cake Recipe

  Tried it? Rate this Recipe:
 

 

This recipe for Vinerterta Cake, by , is from Abundance, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Lorraine Christensen Mukerji
Added: Friday, May 20, 2005

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
Cake prep: Cream 1 c shortening (butter or half butter/half lard). Add two c sugar. Beat in 4 eggs
Add: 1/2 c sour cream. 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp cardamon (whole, shelled and finely crushed just before using).

Sift: 6 c flour, 1 tsp soda, 1 tsp baking powder

Filling: 4 lb prunes, 1 c sugar, juice of 1 lemon, 1 tsp cardamon

Directions:
Directions:
Roll cake mixture out and bake in cake tins or 12x8-inch cookie sheet. Bake until done in 350-degree oven. The cake should have five to six layers each. I have patted dough into tins, but can be too rich that way.
For filling, drain prunes because filling must be thick. Add to prunes the sugar, lemon juice and cardamom. Cool.
Spread filling between cake layers. Wrap in waxed paper and store in cool place for at least a week. It keeps a long time, but can mold. Slice thin and serve. It freezes well.

Number Of Servings:
Number Of Servings:
Two cakes
Preparation Time:
Preparation Time:
Several hours
Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
My mother, Agnes Buller Christensen, made this Vinerterta cake each year for the Christmas holidays. She told me that when she was growing up, Grandpa Henry Buller would bring home a large tin of prunes from town for the winter -- dried prunes were a dessert that the family could afford and they kept well, up somewhere near the rafters. Each Sunday, the family had dessert -- the treat for the week! This was often stewed prunes. I think this anecdote explains why prunes were featured in the Christmas Vinerterta, in "plumalos," and also in "kolaches."
I had always imagined that Vinerterta was Austrian (from "Wein" or "Vienna"), but Mom's recipe says it's Icelandic. Lyle Buller and Florence Buller Cairns might have some additions or corrections to these comments. We'd all love to hear them.

 

 

 

Learn more about the process to create a cookbook -- or
Start your own personal family cookbook right now!  Here's to good eating!

Search for more great recipes here from over 500,000 in our family cookbooks!

 

Bookmark and Share

 

 

2122W  

Cookbooks are great for Holiday Gifts, Wedding Gifts, Bridal Shower ideas and Family Reunions!

*Recipes and photos entered into the Family Cookbook Project are provided by the submitting contributors. All rights are retained by the contributor. Please contact us if you believe copyright violations have occurred.


Search for more great recipes here from over 500,000 in our family cookbooks!