"A man who was fond of wine was offered some grapes at dessert after dinner. "Much obliged," said he, pushing the plate aside; "I am not accustomed to take my wine in pills."--Jean Antheleme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste

Grandpa Amos' P-p-p-pinto Beans Recipe

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This recipe for Grandpa Amos' P-p-p-pinto Beans, by , is from Trent Willmon's Beer Man Cookbook Project, one of the cookbooks created at FamilyCookbookProject.com. We help families or individuals create heirloom cookbook treasures.

Contributor:  
Contributor:  
Trent Willmon
Added: Tuesday, January 2, 2007

Category:
Category:

Ingredients:  
Ingredients:  
2 pounds pinto beans
1 onion
2 or 3 cloves garlic
Meat (leftover roast, ham, ham hocks, raw bacon - whatever beef or pork, in whatever amount you have or want)
2 tbsp chili powder
1/2 tsp oregano
Salt to taste (Save it for later so you don't toughen the skins)
catsup or tomato paste (Start with 1/4 cup; add to taste)
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
Brown sugar (optional)

Directions:
Directions:
I really do not remember if he soaked his beans (Doing so will quicken the cooking rate, but gives a different texture. Try them both ways). Anyway, he said to boil the beans 20 minutes then pour off the water. Add more water and bring to boil for 15 minutes before adding the other ingredients. Continue simmering until beans quit "rattling."

My post-script to this recipe: Instead of the catsup or paste, I use canned tomatoes (Rotel, usually, because of the spicy flavor). I may throw in a couple of jalapeņos and - close to the end of the cooking - some chopped cilantro. (If you add the cilantro too soon, the delicate flavor gets lost).

Personal Notes:
Personal Notes:
My Grandpa always had fun talking about his p-p-p-pinto beans, as he never quite figured out how to remove the "gas" from them, except by expelling it after consumption. I really don't remember either him or the beans being particularly "offensive." Nevertheless, he never resisted the joke, always sounding like a motorboat when he pronounced "pinto." When he made them, he always made a bunch (Two pounds is a lot of beans), but pintos taste better as time goes by. Hint: If you'll heat them up to the boiling point every day or two, they'll probably last two weeks - if somebody doesn't "scarf" them up first! I got a lot of my sense of humor - and some pretty good stories - from my Grandpa.

 

 

 

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